FedEx Delivery Scam #00000968421

Please share this scam alert with your friends on Facebook and Twitter.

The message below is an example of a phishing scam, one that is similar to the “abandoned shipment” scams used by advance-fee fraudsters. In this case, someone claiming to be from FedEx says they tried to deliver your package (what package?), but couldn’t, and so you should open the attached shipping label to check what went wrong. (The attachment is deleted here for safety.) Never open any attachment you receive from an unknown source — you can be almost certain that it contains a virus or some other gimmick to steal your private information.

Subject: Shipment delivery problem #00000968421
Date: Wed, 29 Jun 2016
From: “FedEx Standard Overnight” jack.berg@ipd.edu.pl
Reply-To: “FedEx Standard Overnight”

Dear Customer,

Your parcel has arrived at June 28. Courier was unable to deliver the parcel to you.
Shipment Label is attached to email.

Thank you for choosing FedEx,
Jack Berg,
Operation Manager.

Here at the Scam Hunter website (scamhunter.org) we document scam messages like the one above in order to help people around the world stay safe from online frauds and scams. Please share our scam alerts with your friends and family today.

Coastal Federal Credit Union (scam warning)

Please share this scam alert with your friends on Facebook and Twitter.

The message below is an example of a dangerous kind of “phishing” scam, designed to steal your bank account information. The “login here” link (deactivated in this copy) pointed to a website in Russia, where you can be sure there are scammers ready to try to empty your bank account.

If you ever get a suspicious message of this kind from your bank or credit card company, it’s always a good idea to call for confirmation before replying.

Date: Sun, 26 Jun 2016
From: “alerts@coastal24.org” coastal24@box167.rapidenet.ca
Subject: Action: Changes made in your Internet Banking Profile

Coastal Federal Credit Union
Dear customer

This is to inform that your profile data was changed by you or by someone logged in using your Coastal24 ID and password on 06.22.2016 from IP [deleted].

If you didn’t change your profile data please login here and complete the Coastal24 security measures:

Sincerely,
Coastal Federal Credit Union
Please do not reply to this e-mail, this is not a monitored e-mail address and we are unable to respond

Here at the Scam Hunter (scamhunter.org) we document scam messages like the one above in order to help people around the world stay safe from online frauds and scams. Please share our scam alerts with your friends and coworkers today.

Bank of American Irregular Account Activity (scam)

Please share this phishing scam alert with your friends on Facebook and Twitter.

This is a classic example of a password phishing scam. (Read more about how phishing scams work.) The message claims to be from a real bank, but in fact it comes from a scammer trying to steal your bank account information. The attachment (deleted and deactivated here) asks you to enter your private account information, which would then be sent automatically not to the bank, but to the scammer.

From: BankofAmerica bankofamerica@services.com
Subject: Irregular account activity !
Date: Mon, 7 Dec 2015

We detected irregular activity on your account on the date 12/3/2015.

For your protection, we have temporary limited your account.

In order to regain full access to your account, you must verify this activity before you can continue using your account.

We have sent you an attachment , open it and follow the steps to verify your account.
Once completed, please allow up to 24h to update.

We are sorry for the inconvenience.

Good Day,
Bank of America

IrregularActivityFile.html
38K [DELETED AND DEACTIVATED HERE]

Here at the Scam Hunter website (scamhunter.org) we document scam messages like the one above in order to help people around the world stay safe from online scams and frauds. Please share our scam alerts with your friends and coworkers today.

Webmail Phishing Scam

Please share this scam alert with your friends on Facebook and Twitter.

The message below is a standard type of “phishing” scam designed to steal your private account information. Scammers send messages like this randomly to thousands of people in tho hope that just a few will be tricked into responding. If you got this message and clicked the link it contained (deactivated here for safety) the scammer could have gotten access to your passwords and private email account.

Subject: Webmail Account Services
From: Webmail Account Services
Date: Wed, 4 Nov 2015
Reply-To: walton5671@yandex.com

Hello Email User, We noticed a login to your Webmail account from an unrecognized device on Friday, August 28, 2015 4:07 PM GMT+1 from London, UK.Was this you? If so, please disregard the rest of this email. If this wasn’t you, please follow the links below to keep your E-Mail account safe and provide required information to keep your account ACTIVE. lick this link to verify your account okay: formcrafts.com [deactivated here for safety] Thanks, Webmail Account Services Please do not reply to this message. Mail sent to this address cannot be answered.

Here at the Scam Hunter (scamhunter.org) we document scam messages like the one above to help people around the world stay safe online. Please share our scam alerts with your friends and coworkers today.

PayPal Virus Alert

This is a dangerous phishing scam message that looks like it is coming from the online payment service PayPal. If you ever get a message with an attachment that you are not expecting, don’t open the attachment. (It has been removed and deactivated here.) Scammers use messages like this one to either steal your private account information or infect your computer with a virus:

From: PayPal members@system.com
Subject: -Notification
Date: Sat, 10 Oct 2015

Dear Valued Recipient,

An intrusion from an un-authorized user have triggered our Secure Login Feature (Auto-geolocation analysis shows that it wasn’t you). Currently, your account is limited.

When PayPal limits your account, it means that you won’t be able to do certain things with your account; you might not be able to send or withdraw money (temporarily).

PayPal may limit your account as a security measure to protect you and your account. Access limitation is taken as a pre-caution.

An attachment is given to you through this notification. Please download and open it in your browser to verify your account.

* PayPal will restore your access back to normal after your form is checked and your account is verified.

Thank you for your attention to this matter, and we hope that this issue will be resolved as soon as possible.

Notified by,
PayPal

[ATTACHMENT: verification.html 38K REMOVED AND DEACTIVATED]

Here at the Scam Hunter website (scamhunter.org) we document ongoing scams like this one to help people around the world stay safe online. Please share our scam warnings with your friends and coworkers today.

Your AppIe ID has been disabled (scam warning)

This is a standard phishing scam message aimed at people who may have an Apple computer ID. It is not a legitimate message from Apple: it is an attempt to steal your passwords and other private account information. (The scam link is deactivated in the copy below for safety.)

You should always be suspicious of unsolicited email messages that ask you to click on a link and enter private information. That is how scammers can gain access to your private accounts.

Subject: Your AppIe ID has been disabled for security reasons !
Date: Fri, 25 Sep 2015
From: Apple ID ne_pas_repond@apple.id.com

Dear Customer,

You have a problem in your Apple account, you must complete the data to check, you have a period of 24 hours s business.

Check now [link deactivated for safety]

For more information, see Questions and Answers.

Thank you,
Assistance to Apple customers

Here at ScamHunter.org we document scams and frauds of this kind to help people around the world stay safe online. Please share our scam alerts with your friends and coworkers today.

Pretrial Requirements (phishing scam / virus)

This is a dangerous type of scam message, one that arrives with an attachment that probably contains a computer virus. It attempts to frighten you into opening the attachment (which is deactivated here) by implying that you are supposed to appear in court and need to respond immediately to acknowledge the conditions of your trial.

Please share this important scam warning with your friends on Facebook or Twitter, and never open an email attachment that comes from an unknown source.

From: Stella alberto.battaglini0@alice.it
Date: Sat, 12 Sep 2015
Subject: Pretrial requirements

Please read pretrial requirements in attached document.
Waiting for your reply

pretrial_requirements.zip

Shortly after the above message arrived, I received a second copy from a different email address, showing that the sender’s account in each case has probably been hacked and is sending these messages without the true owner’s knowledge:

From: Belle gioian3@alice.it
Date: Sat, 12 Sep 2015
Subject: Pretrial requirements

Please read pretrial requirements in attached document.
Waiting for your reply

pretrial.zip

Here at the Scam Hunter website (scamhunter.org) we document messages like these to help protect people from online scams and frauds. Study the resources we have available and share them with your online friends.

Notice to Appear in Court (scam alert)

Some of the most dangerous scams are the ones that take a bullying/threatening approach to potential victims. “You are in trouble,” or “Your payment is overdue,” or, in this case, “You must appear in court.”

But ask yourself: would any real legal notice come from an email address at “tesene.info” (whatever that is)? And it’s a message from “State Court” — but what state? Clearly the scammer would never specify a particular location because the message is going to be blasted to thousands of random people all over the world, and if the supposed location wasn’t near you, you’d immediately recognize it as a scam.

Subject: Notice to Appear in Court
Date: Fri, 7 Aug 2015
From: “State Court” alfredo.peck@dc.tesene.info

Notice to Appear,

You have to appear in the Court on the August 13.
Please, prepare all the documents relating to the case and bring them to Court on the specified date.

Note: The case may be heard by the judge in your absence if you do not come.

The Court Notice is attached to this email.

Yours faithfully,
Alfredo Peck,
Court Secretary.

This message also came with an attachment (deleted here for safety). Opening attachments from people you don’t know is never wise, and this one probably contained a virus or a scam link that would have infected your computer.

Here at ScamHunter.org we document frauds like this to help people avoid them. Share this scam alert with your friends and help keep them safe from scammers too!

Naoyuki Shinohara, Deputy Managing Director (scam alert)

Online scammers, like sleazy used car salesmen, know that bullying is often an effective strategy to get people to part with their money. In this message, sent probably to thousands of random people, “Naoyuki Shinohara” insists that you contact him about the money you owe. Comply!

Reply-To: deputymanagingdirect@gmail.com
From: “Deputy Managing Director.(I.M.F)” noreply@netlogmail.com
Subject: Re: Read and Comply…07/28/2015
Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2015

Dear Friend.

Get back upon the receipt of this message for more clarification towards your over due funds.

Regards

Mr. Naoyuki Shinohara
Deputy Managing Director.(I.M.F)
deputymanagingdirect@gmail.com

Deputy Managing Director of what? “I.M.F.”? (The International Monetary Fund? Really?) In truth, “Naoyuki Shinohara” is just another online fraudster using bullying tactics to try to steal your money — he may be using someone else’s real name, but the person actually sending the message is nothing but a scammer. Study the resources we have here at ScamHunter.org, and share them with your friends, and you’ll be able to avoid scams like these.

Ross Yoder, E-ZPass Support

One of the oldest tricks in the scamming playbook is to send people bills for things they never bought, hoping that maybe a few people will pay up anyway. This is the latest version of that old scam: a message that claims you haven’t paid your highway tolls and should do so immediately.

Subject: Indebted for driving on toll road
Date: Wed, 15 Jul 2015
From: “E-ZPass Manager” ross.yoder@usloft1328.serverloft.com

Notice to Appear,

You have a unpaid bill for using toll road.
You are kindly asked to pay your debt as soon as possible.

The invoice is attached to this email.

Kind regards,
Ross Yoder,
E-ZPass Support.

How do I know it’s a scam? Well, for one thing, I never drive on toll roads and don’t use E-ZPass. But even if I did, the return address, which doesn’t point to the named company, would tell me what I need to know: this isn’t an authentic message.

Study the resources we have here at ScamHunter.com and you’ll learn how to protect yourself from many different kinds of online scams and frauds.