Sumudu Saliph, Ministry of Finance

The scam message below purports to come from the classic source for 419 scams: a Nigerian government agency. It also employs the typical tactics used by sociopaths to control their victims: psychological bullying and abuse. They have entrusted money to you, you see, and you have not acted responsibly and should be ashamed of yourself.

Reply-To: debtmanagementofficefmf@gmail.com
Date: Sun, 31 May 2015
Subject: EXPEDICT ACTION ON THIS FAST, FROM THE FEDERAL MINISTRY OF FINANCE
From: “FEDERAL MINISTRY OF FINANCE NIGERIA.” debtmanagementofficefmf2@gmail.com

FROM THE FEDERAL MINISTRY OF FINANCE
FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF NIGERIA
Plot 62 WUSE 2 ABUJA FCT

Email:debtmanagementoffice50@yahoo.com
Tell: +234-809-554-9669.

ATTN:

In fairness to mankind, your attitude does not depict someone behooving of this large amount of funds; you can never cherish what you do not value. Simply put that your attitude towards this payment determines this payment’s attitude towards you.

You have been so lackadaisical and too casual to benefit this fund that as a staff of the Debt Management Office, I am beginning to sieve information and ask questions while weighing issues on the scale of common reasoning.

The characters you portray does not befit a beneficiary of funds as large as $32M USD,even if you are being used as conduit pipe or channel to courier this funds out by some highly placed individual, I am sure the person did not do his homework well unless he is an amateur because with my experience in this job as it relates to the syndication of international financial coupons, your conduct has fallen below expectation unless you want me to believe that you are not conversant with the terrain and may need help.

The approval for this payment by the Finance Ministry and Budget Office as I met on record has remained in your favor because your name and particulars here never emerged from the blues just as I do not know you from Adam, the ball is in your court for whatever you want to do with your payment.

Know you please that in the event that nothing serious happens fast, this fund will be retired to the treasury as unclaimed while your file would be assumed as treated and finally closed.

I am here for you in the event that you need me, I fly straight.

Thanks,

Sumudu Saliph
Debt Management Office

If you make the mistake of replying to this scammer you can be sure that more lies, abuse, and psychological manipulation will be aimed at you.

Discover Card Phishing Scam

“Phishing” is computer slang for “stealing passwords and private account information.” Every major bank or credit card company is a target of phishing scammers, and everyone on the Internet needs to learn to recognize phishing scams.

(See more examples of phishing scam messages.)

In the message below, which would have been sent randomly to thousands of people, you are told there’s a problem with your account and need to correct it. But if you click the link (always deactivated here for safety), you will be taken not to the official Discover Card site, but to a scam website that will try to steal your private information.

Subject: Update Your Account
From: Discover Card skipper989@verizon.net
Date: Fri, 30 May 2015

Important Notice

Warning,

Some information on your account appears to be missing or incorrect.

Please confirm your information promptly so that you can continue to enjoy all the benefits of your Discover account.

If you don’t confirm your information, we’ll limit what you can do with your Discover account.

Here’s a link to all the legal details

Validate your account Here [Link deactivated here for safety.]

Thank you for being a Discover customer.

If you ever get a message of this type and are unsure if it’s authentic, it’s always a good idea to call your bank or credit card company and ask for confirmation.

Wells Fargo Phishing Scam

Every major bank or e-commerce site (PayPal, Amazon. etc.) is used by scammers trying to “fish” for private passwords. In this latest example, customers of Wells Fargo Bank are being targeted. The scam link — deactivated below for safety reasons — will take you not to a genuine Wells Fargo website, but instead to the scammer’s website where he will try to capture your private account information.

Subject: Important Notice : Update Your Account
From: Wellsfargo
Date: Fri, 29 May 2015

Dear Wellsfargo User,

Due to our recent security checks, Wellsfargo accounts have been the target to phishers and this has raised security concerns.

We’ve taken this precaution to protect our members while we make sure that the activity doesn’t cause harm–even unintentionally–to the Wellsfargo community.

Unfortunately, you won’t be able to use your Wellsfargo account in any way. To regain your access update your Wellsfargo account We appreciate your understanding

Click Here To LOGIN TO BEGING THE PROCESS [Link deactivated for safety]

Thank you,

Wellsfargo Security

2015 Wellsfargo Inc. All rights reserved & Co

If you ever get an unexpected message from your bank or from another financial services company, it’s always a good idea to check by phone to see whether the message is legitimate.

Maxwells Email Financial Support (scam)

This scam message, sent no doubt to tens of thousands of people in the last few days, takes a novel approach to picking your pocket. “Richard and Angela Maxwell,” you see, are already lottery winners, and they are feeling generous. You may not have won the lottery yourself, but they want to share their winnings with you! What could be better?

Subject: ©2015 The Maxwells Email Financial Support Project
From: “Richard Maxwell” richard.maxwell@gmail.com
Date: Sat, 30 May 2015
Reply-To: info@maxwellsfoundation.co.uk

Congratulations Dear,

This is an email correspondence from Richard & Angela Maxwell, £53M Euromillions jackpot winners to acknowledge that your email was selected by a Google powered email newsletter software operated by registered British freelance tech experts upon our request to receive a cash donation of £1million from our family. For Claims, Send Name, Address, & Tel. Find more info here

Richard & Angela Maxwell.

Unfortunately, it’s just another version of the good old “advance fee fraud.” If you answer them, you’ll discover that they need you to pay “fees” and “taxes” up front before you can get your money, and then if you pay they will disappear, never to be heard from again.

Kelly Motanga, Rich Orphan (scam alert)

Who wouldn’t want to help an orphan — especially a wealthy orphan who would like to share a fortune with you! Rich orphan scams are one of the classic types of advance fee fraud. They are the children of deposed dictators, or millionaire businessmen who died in plane crashes, and somehow they got your name and need your help. “Kelly Motanga” is the latest example:

Reply-To: mail.kelly.motanga@gmail.com
From: “kelly” kelly.motanga21@yahoo.com.ph
Subject: PLEASE I NEED YOUR ADVICE.
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015

This mail may come to you as a surprise base on the fact that we have not met. Please I need your help my name is KELLY MOTANGA am 26 years of age the son of a late minister during the reign of President Mobutu SeseSeko in Democratic Republic of Congo I decide to contact you because I believe you are a reputable person and I felt you can help us over this confidential matter.

My father was killed during the rebel attack and our house was burnt down We manage to escape to IRELAND with my mum and kid sister where we are now taking refuge.

Before the death of my father he deposited 20 MILLION DOLLARS with a Security Company in Ghana. When my late father heard of the plot to kill him, he instructed the Security Company in Ghana to move the boxes containing the Money to OVERSEA by diplomatic Courier Service.

But unfortunately my Father could not escape out of CONGO he was eventually killed, though he could not claim the Boxes before his untimely death. The boxes is presently in Under the care of the Diplomat that moved it to OVERSEA is in the care of the diplomatic shipping company that take it to OVERSEA but the Diplomat or the Customs don’t know that it is Money that is in the Boxes.

My late father partner that we contact to help us receive the consignments is acting very greedy and we do not trust him anymore so my mum put a stop to the delivery of the consignments to him. Please we need you to help us receive the consignments in your custody.

More so, We need you to help us invest this money in a lucrative business your country and take us as one family and you will also buy a house for us over there where we can live safely. We are prepared to compensate you with 20% of the money for your assistance.

Please I am counting on your integrity and honesty to be able to handle this business transaction. I hope to hear from you soon.

Best Regards,
Kelly Motanga.

Unfortunately, if you reply, “Kelly” will string you along with a million stories until you’re the one sending the money, and then “Kelly” will disappear, never to be heard from again.

Mrs. Cedella Kevaughn Watson (scam alert)

This is a classic (and rather primitive) example of the dying-widow cancer-patient scam. “Cedella Watson” hasn’t got very long to live, and she needs your help in disposing of her fortune (even though you’ve never heard of her). And why would the widow of a Jamaican ambassador to Africa be writing to you anyway? (And writing from a free email address in India?)

Subject: Volunteer found after missing more than 24 hours
From: cedellak@yahoo.in
Reply-To: cedellak@yahoo.in
Date: Tue, 26 May 2015

http://search-dogs.carda.org/news/p2_articleid/4

MY NAME IS MRS. CEDELLA KEVAUGHN WATSON,. WIFE OF LATE AMBASSADOR OF JAMAICA TO IVORY COAST, PLEASE I WANT YOU TO REPLY ME BACK AS SOON AS YOU READ THIS MESSAGE BECAUSE I WANT TO DISCUSS SOMETHING VERY IMPORTANT WITH YOU, I AM A CANCER PATIENT WITH A VERY SHORT TIME TO LIVE AND I AM CONTACTING YOU BECAUSE I WANT TO ENTRUST THE SUM OF (USD$12.7MILLION) TO YOUR HAND AS A DONATION FOR CHARITY WORK., TO HELP THE ORPHANAGES, WIDOWS, AND MOTHERLESS CHILDREN AROUND YOU, THIS MONEY WAS DEPOSITED BY MY LATE HUSBAND IN ONE OF THE SECURITY COMPANY HERE IN ABIDJAN AND OUR PLAN WAS TO USE IT FOR INTERNATIONAL INVESTMENT BEFORE THE DEATH OF MY HUSBAND,, I AM WAITING YOUR URGENT REPLY FOR MORE INSTRUCTION AND INFORMATION ABOUT THIS FUND, REGARDS, MRS.CEDELLA KEVAUGHN WATSON

“Mrs. Watson” is a scammer of course, and once she succeeds in picking your pocket you’ll never hear from her again.

Dave Angela Dawes (scam alert)

This is an example of what I call a “mystery scam.” Someone named Dave Angela Dawes (male or female?) has a “draft” for you — that is, a bank draft or check. But who are they? What is it for?

Date: Sat, 23 May 2015
From: Dave Angela Dawes web.office7689@charter.net
Reply-To: daveangeladawes@inbox.lv
Subject:

We like to inform you that we have a draft for you here. Please contact us

We know the real answer to who they are: they are scammers, and the non-existent bank draft is a hook to try to get you to reply. If you do, they’ll try every trick in the book to get you to send them money, and then they’ll disappear.

Patrick David McManamon, Euro Millions

This is a curious combination of a standard advance fee scam message and a lottery scam message. “Patrick” works for the lottery, he says — like many scammers claim to work for banks — and he can help you win a fortune as long as you give him a cut — just like the phony bank scammers claim to have access to dormant accounts.

From: “Banwell, Matthew Allen” BANWELMA@uwec.edu
Subject: About Euro Millions Draw
Date: Fri, 22 May 2015 09:36:41 +0000
Reply-To: “davidmanamon@gmail.com”

I am Patrick David Mc Manamon, the System Operation manager in charge of the Euro Millions draws. I found your contact online. After a brief cogitation, I decided to contact you for an opportunity to have a confidential deal discussed with you if only you will be interested in the deal. I can help you win the Euro-Million prize but I will take 50% of the winnings. Please kindly express your interest by responding to this email so that I can enlighten you more about the deal.
Thanks,
Patrick David Mc Manamon

This particular hook is one that we haven’t seen before here at ScamHunter.org. If it is a successful one (for the scammer) I’m sure we’ll see more.

COL WAFA ALHALABI ADEL, COMMANDER in der syrischen army

You remember Col. Wafa Alhalabi Adel: we met him just a few days ago.

Things have apparently gotten so bad for him and the Syrian Army that now he doesn’t have time to type actual messages, so he just puts the whole communique in the subject line.

Subject: Guten Tag, mein Name ist COL WAFA ALHALABI ADEL, COMMANDER in der syrischen army.I Deine Hilfe benötigen, Mittel zur Zeit beim Roten Kreuz unit.i Ihre ehrliche Antwort erwarten , also kann ich die vollständigen Details geben Grüße Col.Wafa Alhalabi Adel.
To: Recipients col.waalhalabi09@gmail.com
From: “Col.Wafa Alhalabi Adel'” fiks-heinz@t-online.de
Date: Thu, 21 May 2015
Reply-To: col.wafa985@hotmail.com

You don’t have to be able to read German to recognize this as a standard scam message, even though it’s an abbreviated one. The only thing “Col. Wafa” is interested in is getting you on the hook so he can pick your pocket.